Melamine Kitchen Cabinets

Melamine Kitchen Cabinets

The pros and cons of melamine kitchen cabinets When purchasing cabinets, quality, cost and style are important. Make your decision easier by learning about the pros and cons of melamine kitchen cabinets. What is melamine?Melamine starts with a compressed wood particle core. It is then covered with a resin and paper finish that can be manufactured to embody various styles and colours. Melamine is often used for cabinetry in kitchens, bathrooms and other areas throughout the home. What are the pros?1. Durability Melamine cabinets are resistant to many of the common issues presented in a kitchen, whether it be excessive moisture, heat or stains. The reason why melamine can resist these external elements is because of its tough outer coating. This coating is also easy to clean. 2. A large variety Because melamine is a synthetic material, it can be produced with an almost endless number of finishes. You can select from faux wood grains in various shades or solid colours. With this level of choice, you can find the perfect match for your kitchen’s style. 3. A uniform finish Unlike solid wood that can vary in grain patterns and colour, even within the same order, melamine offers a consistent finish since it is manufactured in a controlled setting. 4. Low cost Compared to solid wood cabinets, melamine cabinets are offered at a much lower price point. With these savings, the cost of your new installations or renovations will be a little easier to swallow. What are the cons?1. The cabinets can be heavy Although the weight of the cabinets may not be your first concern, this may mean having to purchase heavy-duty brackets to install your new cabinets. Without proper hanging brackets, the cabinets could fall off your wall, possibly causing expensive damages. 2. Melamine can chip Although the outside resin coating is durable, it can be prone to chipping. Chips will leave the internal wood particle core exposed, and this can be very unattractive. Also, if your cabinets do chip, it can be expensive to have them refinished. 3. Melamine can be harder to install Because of the nature of their construction, melamine cabinets might not pair well with nails and screws. If used improperly, nails and screws can cause the melamine to splinter. For this reason, having a professional installation team can be beneficial. 4. Melamine is susceptible to water damage If the wood particle core of the cabinets gets saturated with water, it can compromise their structural integrity. Water can be absorbed into this material more easily than solid wood, so you should be aware of this when installing cabinets next to your sink. Making your decisionIf you are on your way to the hardware or furniture store to shop for new cabinets, consider the pros and cons of melamine kitchen cabinets. As with any other material, there will be positives and negatives, but remember to keep your budget, product quality and preferences in mind.
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Melamine Kitchen Cabinets

1. The cabinets can be heavy Although the weight of the cabinets may not be your first concern, this may mean having to purchase heavy-duty brackets to install your new cabinets. Without proper hanging brackets, the cabinets could fall off your wall, possibly causing expensive damages. 2. Melamine can chip Although the outside resin coating is durable, it can be prone to chipping. Chips will leave the internal wood particle core exposed, and this can be very unattractive. Also, if your cabinets do chip, it can be expensive to have them refinished. 3. Melamine can be harder to install Because of the nature of their construction, melamine cabinets might not pair well with nails and screws. If used improperly, nails and screws can cause the melamine to splinter. For this reason, having a professional installation team can be beneficial. 4. Melamine is susceptible to water damage If the wood particle core of the cabinets gets saturated with water, it can compromise their structural integrity. Water can be absorbed into this material more easily than solid wood, so you should be aware of this when installing cabinets next to your sink.
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Melamine Kitchen Cabinets

1. Durability Melamine cabinets are resistant to many of the common issues presented in a kitchen, whether it be excessive moisture, heat or stains. The reason why melamine can resist these external elements is because of its tough outer coating. This coating is also easy to clean. 2. A large variety Because melamine is a synthetic material, it can be produced with an almost endless number of finishes. You can select from faux wood grains in various shades or solid colours. With this level of choice, you can find the perfect match for your kitchen’s style. 3. A uniform finish Unlike solid wood that can vary in grain patterns and colour, even within the same order, melamine offers a consistent finish since it is manufactured in a controlled setting. 4. Low cost Compared to solid wood cabinets, melamine cabinets are offered at a much lower price point. With these savings, the cost of your new installations or renovations will be a little easier to swallow.
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Melamine Kitchen Cabinets

Melamine is a type of laminate often used as a covering for furniture and cabinets. Like any other piece of furniture, melamine cabinets eventually show signs of wear and tear. When your kitchen could use a face-lift, there are a number of ways to reface melamine cabinets. Some refacing products are inexpensive, while others cost more. Any homeowner handy with a paintbrush or a craft knife can update old melamine cabinets.
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Question We do kitchens euro style with melamine, and I was wondering if plywood has any advantages over melamine? I know that plywood is stronger, but melamine seems strong enough. If melamine is strong enough, why pay extra for plywood? I was also wondering if anyone had any ideas on what premium to charge for plywood.
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1. The way it looks. When I show a perspective client a finished piece of plywood vs. a piece of melamine, 9 times out of 10, after looking at the depth of the wood, they are more inclined to warm to the VC finished plywood than the melamine. 2. It’s heavy. 3. Does not hold a screw well (even confirmats). As an example, I disassembled a melamine kitchen recently (only a few years old), glued and stapled 3/4″ material with only a hammer, and it only took 10-15 minutes to knock down about 12 cabinets. They literally fell apart with a couple of blows. It is also very easy to rip the doors and hinges off as well. There was one box in the group which must have been added later that was made of 1/2″ ply, and had dadoed shelves. It took me about 3 minutes to turn that one cabinet into a stack of rubble (mostly because of the dadoed shelves). 4. It smells! 5. Chips easily when cutting if the blade is not sharp all the time. 6. Difficult to work with. 7. Have to edge-band it. 8. De-lamination issues. 9. Surface breaks when using screws (try and get it right the first time – otherwise it looks awful – even with the hole-tab). 10. Sub-materials degrade over time (joints loosen). 11. Hinges loosen easier over time (door sags). 12. Does not hold moldings well without glue or nailers.
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Forum Responses (Cabinetmaking Forum) From contributor O: I agree that melamine is perfect for all types of cabinetry. You still get the same quality, and it is easier to clean and you don’t have to worry about getting poor quality plywood. I’ve seen plywood (pre-finished and finished) warped, peeling apart, etc. But melamine always looks good, is straight, and comes in many colors. If you sell the right color, you can have melamine interiors that match your finish without all the extra labor.
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I have to honestly say, I have never had the guts to recommend that a client paint thermofoil, laminate, or melamine kitchen cabinets.  This type of cabinetry is often found in lower-end kitchens – melamine and thermofoil are similar plastic materials that are applied over particleboard or MDF to inexpensively simulate the look of painted wood. Although I had heard it could be done with chalk paint, I really didn’t know it was possible with latex paint.  Let me reword that:  possible, maybe, but advisable? Probably not.
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Because of the nature of their construction, melamine cabinets might not pair well with nails and screws. If used improperly, nails and screws can cause the melamine to splinter.
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Looks fabulous Allison and Kristie ! So good to know about the proper paint to use for this melamine surface, as I have this type of cabinets in our mountain home. Kristie, you are really brave when it comes to painting surfaces that we previously thought you could not paint. Thanks to you, we now know you can paint bricks and stone, paneling, fabric upholstery, and now melamine. Wow !! I still have not painted on fabric, but it is on my bucket list of things to paint ! Kudos, Mary CC from California
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The reality of this whole situation is that each of the materials – melamine and plywood, both have their ups and downs. Like Contributor K said, melamine is weak, chips easy when cut, and holds screws poorly. Plywood, however, is hard to get in perfect – it